October Featured Author

Dr. Imhoff

Andreas Imhoff, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Director of the 
Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine
Hospital Rechts der Isar, University of Munich
Munich, Germany

From the October Issue: “Osteochondral Autologous Transfer Combined With Valgus High Tibial Osteotomy: Long-Term Results and Survivorship Analysis”

Podcast: Listen to Dr. Imhoff discuss his article from the October issue.

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Dr. Andreas Imhoff is a professor of orthopaedic surgery and the director of the Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine at Tech. University Munich in Germany.  The research of Professor Imhoff focuses on the cartilage and tissue engineering of tendons and the meniscus and on the biomechanics of the shoulder and knee joint. He also conducts research into new minimally invasive techniques for arthroscopic operations on athletes.

Professor Imhoff completed his medical degree at the University of Basel where he also received his PhD in 1980. Positions as a doctor and scientist led him to the Universities of Basel (surgery, trauma surgery, orthopedics), Zurich (orthopedics, neurology) and Pittsburgh (sports orthopedics). In 1996 he was appointed as successor to Professor W. Bernett at TUM.

Dr. Imhoff has received numerous awards and served as a part of many professional societies.

Selected Other Published Works in AJSM

Biomechanical Comparison Between Suture Anchor and Transtibial Pull-out Repair for Posterior Medial Meniscus Root Tears Am J Sports Med September 9, 2013 ; published online before print September 9, 2013, doi:10.1177/0363546513502946

Biomechanical Evaluation of Different Suture Techniques for Arthroscopic Transtibial Pull-out Repair of Posterior Medial Meniscus Root Tears Am J Sports Med September 6, 2013 ; published online before print September 6, 2013, doi:10.1177/0363546513502464

Isolated and Combined Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Revision Surgery for Patellofemoral Instability: A Prospective Study Am J Sports Med September 2013 41 2128-2135; published online before print August 7, 2013, doi:10.1177/0363546513498572

Arthroscopically Assisted 2-Bundle Anatomic Reduction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Separations: 58-Month Findings Am J Sports Med March 2013 41 615-621; published online before print January 31, 2013, doi:10.1177/0363546512473438

Sports Activity After Osteochondral Transplantation of the Talus Am J Sports Med April 2012 40 870-874; published online before print January 20, 2012, doi:10.1177/0363546511435084

Osteochondral Transplantation in the Elbow Leads to Good Clinical and Radiologic Long-term Results: An 8- to 14-Year Follow-up Examination Am J Sports Med December 2011 39 2619-2625; published online before print August 25, 2011, doi:10.1177/0363546511420127

Control of Posterior Tibial Slope and Patellar Height in Open-Wedge Valgus High Tibial Osteotomy Am J Sports Med April 2011 39 851-856; published online before print January 6, 2011, doi:10.1177/0363546510388929

Arthroscopic Repair of Anterior-Inferior Glenohumeral Instability Using a Portal at the 5:30-o’Clock Position: Analysis of the Effects of Age, Fixation Method, and Concomitant Shoulder Injury on Surgical Outcomes Am J Sports Med September 2010 38 1795-1803; published online before print June 21, 2010, doi:10.1177/0363546510370199

Arthroscopically Assisted 2-Bundle Anatomical Reduction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Separations Am J Sports Med June 2010 38 1179-1187; published online before print May 4, 2010, doi:10.1177/0363546509355645

Radiologic Evaluation of the Insertion Sites of the 2 Functional Bundles of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using 3-dimensional Computed Tomography Am J Sports Med December 2009 37 2368-2376; published online before print August 17, 2009, doi:10.1177/0363546509341577

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