January Featured Authors

Michael Davies, MD
University of California, San Francisco

From the January issue: Rotator Cuff Tear Size Regulates Fibroadipogenic Progenitor Number and Gene Expression Profile in the Supraspinatus Independent of Patient Age

Podcast: Listen to Drs. Davies and Feeley discuss their article in the January issue.

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Michael Davies, MD, is a resident in the department of Orthopaedic Surgery at UCSF. He grew up in San Diego, and received his bachelor of science degree from Stanford University. He attended medical school at UCSF. He has been conducting research with the Feeley-Liu lab at UCSF since 2013.

Selected Other Published Work

Lee C, Agha O, Liu M, Davies M, Bertoy L, Kim HT, Liu X, Feeley BT. Rotator Cuff Fibro-Adipogenic Progenitors Demonstrate Highest Concentration, Proliferative Capacity, and Adipogenic Potential Across Muscle Groups. J Orthop Res. 2020 May;38(5):1113-1121. doi: 10.1002/jor.24550. Epub 2019 Dec 13. PMID: 31799698.

Wang Z, Liu X, Davies MR, Horne D, Kim H, Feeley BT. A Mouse Model of Delayed Rotator Cuff Repair Results in Persistent Muscle Atrophy and Fatty InfiltrationThe American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2018;46(12):2981-2989. doi:10.1177/0363546518793403.

Dang A, Davies M. Rotator Cuff Disease: Treatment Options and Considerations. Sports Med Arthrosc Rev. 2018 Sep;26(3):129-133. doi: 10.1097/JSA.0000000000000207. PMID: 30059447.

Davies MR, Garcia S, Tamaki S, Liu X, Lee S, Jose A, Pomerantz JH, Feeley BT. Muscle stem cell activation in a mouse model of rotator cuff injury. J Orthop Res. 2018 May;36(5):1370-1376. doi: 10.1002/jor.23679. Epub 2018 Mar 9. PMID: 28786534; PMCID: PMC5803476.

Brian Feeley, MD
Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service
Director, Muscle Stem Cell Lab
Professor, Residence
University of California, San Francisco

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Brian Feeley, MD is the Chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, and is currently a Professor in Residence. He grew up in the Bay Area, and received his bachelor of science degree from Stanford University and his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine before serving his residency in the UCLA Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He completed a sports medicine and shoulder fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, where he also served as an assistant team physician to the New York Giants. He has been at UCSF since 2008.

Selected Other Published Work

Feeley BT, Powell JW, Muller MS, Barnes RP, Warren RF, Kelly BT. Hip injuries and labral tears in the national football league. Am J Sports Med. 2008 Nov;36(11):2187-95. doi: 10.1177/0363546508319898. Epub 2008 Jul 18. PMID: 18641370.

Rugg, C. M., Coughlan, M. J., Li, J. N., Hame, S. L., & Feeley, B. T. (2021). Early sport specialization among former National Collegiate Athletic Association Athletes: trends, scholarship attainment, injury, and attritionThe American journal of sports medicine49(4), 1049-1058.

Wiggins, A. J., Agha, O., Diaz, A., Jones, K. J., Feeley, B. T., & Pandya, N. K. (2021). Current Perceptions of Diversity Among Head Team Physicians and Head Athletic Trainers: Results Across US Professional Sports LeaguesOrthopaedic journal of sports medicine9(10), 23259671211047271.

Feeley, B. T., Liu, M., Ma, C. B., Agha, O., Aung, M., Lee, C., & Liu, X. (2020). Human rotator cuff tears have an endogenous, inducible stem cell source capable of improving muscle quality and function after rotator cuff repairThe American journal of sports medicine48(11), 2660-2668.

Lansdown, D. A., Cvetanovich, G. L., Zhang, A. L., Feeley, B. T., Wolf, B. R., Hettrich, C. M., & Ma, C. B. (2020). Risk factors for intra-articular bone and cartilage lesions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for posterior instabilityThe American journal of sports medicine48(5), 1207-1212.

Wang, Z., Liu, X., Jiang, K., Kim, H., Kajimura, S., & Feeley, B. T. (2020). Intramuscular brown fat activation decreases muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration and improves gait after delayed rotator cuff repair in miceThe American journal of sports medicine48(7), 1590-1600.

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